Suspect links


Jad El-Khoury
 

Agree

 

And at the risk of being inaccurate again (comparing ETag with Content Hash), we can start with the simple non-CM suspect tagging (just to indicate that the other end might have changed). And then of course tackle Validity.

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 13:34
To: Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Cc: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>; oslc-op@...
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Jad

 

This is correct. But imo we need to put it in the standard roadmap.  Validity is essential for linked data processes to stay outside.

 

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 8:27, Jad El-Khoury <jad@...> wrote:



I think I got the rough idea. Thanks guys. And one conclusion is that I don’t need to dig into the standard to try to find something. This seems to be Jazz-specific. Regards ______________________________ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

I think I got the rough idea. Thanks guys.

 

And one conclusion is that I don’t need to dig into the standard to try to find something. This seems to be Jazz-specific.

 

Regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 12:05
To: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

I was trying to distinguish the content hash from state. If you create a new version of a versioned artifact and change none of its data, that will create a new state, and that state will be associated with an Etag.

 

The important point about the design is the abstraction between the link validity resource and the source resource(s) and target resource(s) to which it might apply. A link validity resource does not reference specific versions of resources. It only references the content hash of the source and of the target. That was an intentional part of the design so that a link might remain valid and not become suspect when inconsequential changes are made to either the source or the target of the link.

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:58
To: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

David

 

It does represents a state within the resource, not necessarily the total state represented by its memory footprint. This is similar to where we use explicit state models of objects, that abstract away properties which are not relevant for a viewpoint.

 

Just saying “hash” does not convey the idea that validity does consider states of of the resources, across which the are considered valid.

 

Br

Eran

 

 

On 1 Nov 2022, at 6:22, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 




On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


"Eran Gery"
 

Jad

This is correct. But imo we need to put it in the standard roadmap.  Validity is essential for linked data processes to stay outside.

Eran



On 1 Nov 2022, at 8:27, Jad El-Khoury <jad@...> wrote:


I think I got the rough idea. Thanks guys. And one conclusion is that I don’t need to dig into the standard to try to find something. This seems to be Jazz-specific. Regards ______________________________ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart
This Message Is From an External Sender
This message came from outside your organization.
 
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

I think I got the rough idea. Thanks guys.

 

And one conclusion is that I don’t need to dig into the standard to try to find something. This seems to be Jazz-specific.

 

Regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 12:05
To: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

I was trying to distinguish the content hash from state. If you create a new version of a versioned artifact and change none of its data, that will create a new state, and that state will be associated with an Etag.

 

The important point about the design is the abstraction between the link validity resource and the source resource(s) and target resource(s) to which it might apply. A link validity resource does not reference specific versions of resources. It only references the content hash of the source and of the target. That was an intentional part of the design so that a link might remain valid and not become suspect when inconsequential changes are made to either the source or the target of the link.

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:58
To: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

David

 

It does represents a state within the resource, not necessarily the total state represented by its memory footprint. This is similar to where we use explicit state models of objects, that abstract away properties which are not relevant for a viewpoint.

 

Just saying “hash” does not convey the idea that validity does consider states of of the resources, across which the are considered valid.

 

Br

Eran

 

 

On 1 Nov 2022, at 6:22, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


Jad El-Khoury
 

I think I got the rough idea. Thanks guys.

 

And one conclusion is that I don’t need to dig into the standard to try to find something. This seems to be Jazz-specific.

 

Regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 12:05
To: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

I was trying to distinguish the content hash from state. If you create a new version of a versioned artifact and change none of its data, that will create a new state, and that state will be associated with an Etag.

 

The important point about the design is the abstraction between the link validity resource and the source resource(s) and target resource(s) to which it might apply. A link validity resource does not reference specific versions of resources. It only references the content hash of the source and of the target. That was an intentional part of the design so that a link might remain valid and not become suspect when inconsequential changes are made to either the source or the target of the link.

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:58
To: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

David

 

It does represents a state within the resource, not necessarily the total state represented by its memory footprint. This is similar to where we use explicit state models of objects, that abstract away properties which are not relevant for a viewpoint.

 

Just saying “hash” does not convey the idea that validity does consider states of of the resources, across which the are considered valid.

 

Br

Eran

 

 

On 1 Nov 2022, at 6:22, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


David Honey2
 

I was trying to distinguish the content hash from state. If you create a new version of a versioned artifact and change none of its data, that will create a new state, and that state will be associated with an Etag.

 

The important point about the design is the abstraction between the link validity resource and the source resource(s) and target resource(s) to which it might apply. A link validity resource does not reference specific versions of resources. It only references the content hash of the source and of the target. That was an intentional part of the design so that a link might remain valid and not become suspect when inconsequential changes are made to either the source or the target of the link.

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:58
To: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: oslc-op@...; Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

David

 

It does represents a state within the resource, not necessarily the total state represented by its memory footprint. This is similar to where we use explicit state models of objects, that abstract away properties which are not relevant for a viewpoint.

 

Just saying “hash” does not convey the idea that validity does consider states of of the resources, across which the are considered valid.

 

Br

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 6:22, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 




On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


"Eran Gery"
 

David

It does represents a state within the resource, not necessarily the total state represented by its memory footprint. This is similar to where we use explicit state models of objects, that abstract away properties which are not relevant for a viewpoint.

Just saying “hash” does not convey the idea that validity does consider states of of the resources, across which the are considered valid.

Br
Eran



On 1 Nov 2022, at 6:22, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


David Honey2
 

Sounds like the content hash fullfills the same functionality as the ETag?

 

No, they serve different purposes and have different usage. An Etag header value directly represents the state of a resource. If any aspect of the RDF representation of a resource changes, the Etag must be different. This is required so that proxy HTTP servers can function correctly. The content hash is a hash of some subset of the data and only changes if that subset changes.


From: Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:50
To: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>; Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>; oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Thanks Eran and David for your help Sounds like the content hash fullfills the same functionality as the ETag? From your link (https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Thanks Eran and David for your help

 

Sounds like the content hash fullfills the same functionality as the ETag?

 

From your link (https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity), I read that “If your project does not use configuration management, you can enable suspect link traceability for the project.”.

 

So suspect seems to be the same as validity for non-CM scenarios.

 

It would be useful to have a standard approach to deal with suspect/validity.

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 11:23
To: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>; oslc-op@...
Cc: Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 

 

On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


Jad El-Khoury
 

Thanks Eran and David for your help

 

Sounds like the content hash fullfills the same functionality as the ETag?

 

From your link (https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity), I read that “If your project does not use configuration management, you can enable suspect link traceability for the project.”.

 

So suspect seems to be the same as validity for non-CM scenarios.

 

It would be useful to have a standard approach to deal with suspect/validity.

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

From: David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2022 11:23
To: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>; oslc-op@...
Cc: Jad El-Khoury <jad@...>
Subject: RE: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 

 

On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


David Honey2
 

The point about using a content hash is that it is not necessarily state-specific. For example, a user might change a custom property on a requirement, and because that is not used for the content hash, that change would result in the same content hash and hence not affect the link validity for a test case validates requirement  link to that new version of requirement compared to its history predecessor.

 

The original design supported the idea, in the future, of multiple link validity profiles. A profile represents some aspect of link validity and the subset of data from which a content hash is computed. For example, one might have the default profile, and a separate safety critical profile which might consider more data on each resource for the content hash. Each tool might define the set of data that is used for the content hash for a specific profile. Hence a link might have multiple link validity status values, up to a maximum of one per profile. In practice, ELM only supports one profile (the default profile) and there are currently no plans to support multiple profiles.

 

Best regards,
David

 

From: Eran Gery <eran.gery@...>
Sent: 01 November 2022 10:06
To: oslc-op@...; David Honey2 <david.honey@...>
Cc: jad@...
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 

A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

 

Eran

 



On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:



Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To:
oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


"Eran Gery"
 

Worth adding that the hash represents a state of a resource, as validity is across particular resource states. 
A specific way to encode a state is considering a version of a resource. That means that every time a resource in a configuration gets a new version, it will get a new hash value, and change validity status. 

Eran



On 1 Nov 2022, at 5:25, David Honey2 <david.honey@...> wrote:


Jad, I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https: //www. ibm. com/docs/en/elm/7. 0. 1?topic=traceability-link-validity There is a published vocabulary for it at https: //jazz. net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary ‍ ‍
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart
This Message Is From an External Sender
This message came from outside your organization.
 
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To: oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


David Honey2
 

Jad,

 

I sounds like you’re describing link validity. See https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/elm/7.0.1?topic=traceability-link-validity

 

There is a published vocabulary for it at https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/LinkedData/JazzLinkValidityVocabulary, but none of this is covered by OSLC.

 

There is no eventing/notification for changes to the link validity of links because the data model doesn’t work that way. Each versioned resource is associated with a content hash which an application computes based on some subset of the data it sees as relevant. A link validity resource describes a relationship type, source content hash, target content hash, a status and optional comment. ELM applications discover the link validity status for a specific link in a configuration context using a proprietary private REST API. Report Builder can report on link validity providing the source resources, target resources, and link validity resources are indexed in the Lifecycle Query Engine.

 

Best regards,

David

 

From: oslc-op@... <oslc-op@...> On Behalf Of Jad El-Khoury
Sent: 01 November 2022 05:25
To: oslc-op@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [oslc-op] Suspect links

 

Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart

This Message Is From an External Sender

This message came from outside your organization.

ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

 

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 

Unless otherwise stated above:

IBM United Kingdom Limited
Registered in England and Wales with number 741598
Registered office: PO Box 41, North Harbour, Portsmouth, Hants. PO6 3AU


"Eran Gery"
 

Jad

Suspect links related to any oslc link. not specific to “parent/child”. A classical use case is a link between a requirement and a design element that refines it. 

Also, Suspect information depends on a configuration. A link can be suspect in one configuration and valid in another.

The way it is implemented in Jazz is based on a dedicated service. Applications need to interact with the service to retrieve and update the state of a link.

Eran




On 1 Nov 2022, at 1:25, Jad El-Khoury <jad@...> wrote:


Hi When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices? For example, ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍ ‍
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerStart
This Message Is From an External Sender
This message came from outside your organization.
 
ZjQcmQRYFpfptBannerEnd

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se

 


Jad El-Khoury
 

Hi

 

When creating links between applications, is there some OSLC mechanism to identify and tag “Suspect” OSC links? If not covered by OSLC, any good hints on some good practices?

 

For example,

* how can an OSLC Application know that a resource it links to (in another application) has been changed?

* how can an OSLC Application inform another application that a resource it links to has been changed?

To my understanding

  1. suspect links are only relevant on a parent-child relationship when the parent has changed (to warn the child item that the parent has changed)
  2. And, with OSLC, we don’t really have the semantics of parent-child semantics (which is different from the link direction)

 

 

regards

______________________________

Jad El-khoury, PhD

KTH Royal Institute of Technology

School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Mechatronics Division

Brinellvägen 83, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Phone: +46(0)8 790 6877 Mobile: +46(0)70 773 93 45

jad@..., www.kth.se